Supply list? What Supply List?

Even for Middle and High School students, many parents will find their children’s teachers will have sent supply lists home with the June report card. Others might have to go to a school website to find those supply lists. Perhaps both options are available! Unfortunately, some necessary supplies could be missing, especially to those needed for Home Economics/Human Ecology classes!

If you are fortunate to be in a school that supplies everything for those classes, you can stop reading now. If you don’t know and it’s not clear on the supply list, it’s worth a call to the school in late August. You can take advantage of back-to-school sales or have your student look around your house because you might already have what is needed!

If your school cannot or will not supply your child with supplies, you may be asked for a small amount of money to help fund the course and/or to send supplies. After all, your child will either have food to eat, a sewing project to bring home and use, or both.

In my experience, most students do eat the food they prepare themselves and if they choose the project and fabric, they are excited to take those home and use them. If your family has a limited budget, please contact the school. I believe most schools will have a way to help.

A basic supply list for Home Economics:

  • Apron
  • Hair restraint (clean cap, chef’s hat, hairnet, bandana)
  • Straight pins (not a box of 300!)
  • Pincushion
  • Scissors
  • Needle
  • Stitch ripper
  • Thread
  • Pencil
  • Small box to carry it all

Other classrooms may require more but this is a good start. Best of all, dollar stores carry these basics at a reasonable cost. I can’t vouch for dollar store quality, however! Another source for inexpensive supplies can be a thrift store. You never know what you’ll find there!

Special fabric and matching thread will probably require a trip to a fabric store. Some fabric stores offer discounts to students, anywhere from 10-20% off. Usually the discount doesn’t apply to sale items, but it doesn’t hurt to ask. Please make the discount request before the clerk begins to ring up the sale!

My last piece of advice on this topic is to take the student shopping! When you take your kids shopping, it can be an educational experience in itself when they see what things cost. I know it isn’t always convenient but if they can pick out their own supplies, they will enjoy the work more! Isn’t it wonderful when education is also fun?

A collaboration between the school and the family is beneficial to the student, the teacher and the rest of the family, even if its as simple as having your student well supplied. Please help the school to help your child!

Written by: Sheryl Berglund, DTM

Sheryl taught Home Economics (and other subjects) for 33 years, serving in Souris and Grunthal. She is now a leader in the local Toastmasters International District 64, voluntarily serving Manitoba, NW Ontario and N Minnesota. Her favourite education quote: It is not ignorance but knowledge which is the mother of wonder. (Joseph Wood Krutch)